Former Director blasts River Fields

| 4 Comments

In a courageous letter to the C-J, the past Director of River Fields unloads on the "obstructionist" who have championed the downtown option so fervently and selfishly for years:

'Obstructionists'

I was astounded but not surprised that the first article about River Fields ("River Fields turns 50") made no mention of the negative effect they have had on Louisville and this region's transportation system and economy. We might not be staring down the barrel of a costly "two-bridge solution" if they had not championed the downtown option so fervently and selfishly years ago.

Opposition to the East End Bridge has been their primary focus and fundraising tool for the last decade. Without their use of political, legal and strategic financial influence, the East End Bridge might be near completion today and we would have been able to focus on better and possibly less expensive, less intrusive solutions for Spaghetti Junction and I-65 cross-river traffic.

They see their legacy as conservationists. I see them as misguided obstructionists who are unable to see the big picture for the greater good. Friday's front-page article "Suit wants bridge plans re-evaluated" drives the point home. Did our community leaders know what was up River Fields' sleeve? Wake up, Louisville. You're being sold down the river, literally.

LEE COCHRAN

Louisville 40207

The writer is a former executive director of River Fields, Inc. -- Editor.

4 Comments

I was astounded but not surprised that the first article about water made no mention of the fact that it is wet. We might not be staring down the barrel of a costly "two bridge solution" if it had not flowed through the ohio river valley so feverently and selfishly many years ago.

Flowing downhill has been water's primary focus and fundraising tool for the last decade. Without its interactions with electrostatic, gravitic and Van Der Waal influence, they might have been able to focus better on building a better, shorter bridge over a much narrower Ohio River.

Water sees its legacy as liquidy. I see it as a thawed solid (or possibly a plasma), which is unable to see the big picture for the greater good. Who among us does not want to drive from Prospect to Indiana? Why, that's a connection I need to make ... um ... NEVER EVER EVER! It will never in my lifetime benefit me directly. Recall that I-265 is a sprawl inducement project. Building a super wiffle I-265 with water-defying bridges does not not change the fact that it is a sprawl inducement project.

So I'm not sure what purpose this five minutes of hate serves. 8664 has many good ideas, and certainly sees things more clearly than the establishment, but repeatedly picking on another out-group seems pointless at best.

"five minutes of hate".... "picking on another out-group"... huh?

A lot of us simply see this as calling a spade a spade. And that letter doesn't even come from 8664.

Keeping the current interstate system as it is would be a disaster for the Louisville Metro. If you're looking for quiet and serene places, I would suggest that you consider moving because Louisville is going to have a better interstate system eventually.

Whether anyone likes it or not eventually there will be a serious need for transportation projects to be completed. The degraded state of the local road system is an embarrassment to the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Not to mention the city of Louisville which does want to tout itself as a vacation and travel destination.

Having an antiquated Gene Snyder Freeway which is among the worst Outer Loops in America I've seen is the problem. The Gene Snyder needs at least one more lane in each direction along with the bridge being built across the Ohio. This will ease traffic flows to downtown as well because it will divert non local traffic around the city.

Whether you consider it sprawl or not, it will eventually have to happen for Louisville to be a major city and not a dying one like it current is being pushed into being. Economically the whole area gains by having better transportation. Maybe some of the hazy eyed types are blind to the reality but at this point with 11 percent unemployment and a wide variety of low wage service jobs, Louisville needs a serious building boom to bring it up to par with other US Metros. If companies want to locate to Indiana along 265, they should. That would increase the economic prosperity of the region as a whole. Its not economically productive to the whole region to allow a few groups of people to keep the region in the dark. Having good transportation and communication links would help improve the local situation for everyone.

What this community needs to do is to look out for everyone and not the small minded local groups that want everything to remain in the 1950s or 1960s. Times have changed and Louisville must change or be swept into the dustbin of history

Well now Dave, as long as you're NEVER, EVER, EVER going to use it, I can't think of another single reason to build the east end bridge! You're so right, that river is certainly selfish. I think you should put all your unselfish River Fields Inc. $ into stopping that awfully selfish river too! Maybe River Fields Inc. could just gently divert that ole river to flood Indiana. We don't need them. Most of them are just poor and selfish anyway! Jeff Boat.....HA!

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  • J. Mailex: Well now Dave, as long as you're NEVER, EVER, EVER read more
  • Bill: Keeping the current interstate system as it is would be read more
  • Steve Magruder: "five minutes of hate".... "picking on another out-group"... huh? A read more
  • David Morse: I was astounded but not surprised that the first article read more